Shot for the Day (30 October 2017)


After trekking a few miles from a small car park at Huisinis, which itself was at the end of a long single track B road, I camped in a very isolated position, looking over at the Isle of Scarp.

The following morning, I awoke at 3.20am and walked a further 2 miles, to the end of the peninsula, to watch the majesty of the sun rising over the horizon in absolute solitude. The warm, golden light reflected on the rocks in front of me, silhouetting the distant mountains.  This image was a long exposure (201 seconds) as I wanted to soften the choppy waters and elongate the few clouds on the horizon.

Advertisements

Shot for the Day (4 October 2017)


I drove around Harris on my first evening, looking for the right vantage point for an end of day shot. I spoke to a local farmer, who recommended an isolate beach situated on the far side of his land. Once there, I had the whole place to myself and perhaps one of the finest sunsets I have been fortunate enough to witness.  The colours were so vibrant, the water looked like it was gold, lapping against my feet.

Shot for the Day (20 September 2017)

Clouds rolled in at the last minute to obscure the setting sun over the tiny village of Ardroil, on the Isle of Lewis. I had this huge expanse of sand all to myself with the exception of the occasional dog walker. I had decided to camp a few miles away in a place called Kneep, to capture the 4am sunrise the following morning, which turned out to be an error for two reasons. Firstly, the Kneep campsite was pretty awful, especially in comparison to the wild camping at Ardroil. Secondly, the rain started to fall after the sun dropped and the next day was a wash out.

Shot for the Day (17 September 2017)

This is a curious shot of an end of day scene in the Outer Hebrides where the setting sunlight was caught in the clouds at the centre of the scene, creating a dual light source. This state lasted for an hour. I can truthfully say I have never seen something like this before. I had trekking a few miles into the middle of nowhere, to free camp for the night. My tent was about 2-3km from where I took this shot. There was absolutely no one around for miles, making this scene all the more eerie.

Shot for the Day (15 September 2017)

Earlier this year, I had the good fortune to spend a week in the Outer Hebrides, on the Isle of Harris and Lewis. This was taken on day one, very soon after I arrived at Huisinis. The clouds were just beginning to shift as the wind picked up. I was standing completely alone in this stunning landscape, with only flies and cattle to share the moment with.

Shot for the Day (06 June 2017)

Taken a few days ago on the beach at Budleigh Salterton, the fisherman in the picture very kindly asked if he was ruining my shot by fishing in front of me.  Normally one for trying to avoid human presence in my images, this one worked out very nicely. The lonely fisherman occupies the space between sky and sea.

Shot for the Day (30 March 2017)

High in the Andes, the deep blue skies can be deceptive. This was mid-morning and the lake in front of me was frozen.  At night, the temperature regularly dropped to -20 Celsius.   It was also breathless here as I was standing at over 4,200m altitude.

If you like desolate, abandoned places, the Atacama Desert is the place for you.

Shot for the Day (14 March 2017)

High on the altiplano between Bolivia, Chile and Argentina, the sky is an impossibly deep blue.  The car pulling up was my driver, who played a prank and drove off when I was talking too many photos.  It gave the scene a sense of scale, which was perfect. I ended up asking him to do this a few times over the 4 day trip, much to his bemusement.

Shot for the Day (09 March 2017)

Last time I was in Ushuaia, the most southern city in the world, was back in 2010.  I visited Argentina, Bolivia and Chile for a 20 day photography trip.  I started in Tierra del Fuego and worked my way north.

Ushuaia is an industrial town, situated next to the Beagle Channel, nestled amongst the mountains.  Whilst wondering along the waters edge, I cam across this old tug that had run aground.  The scene felt as desolate as the wintry weather that was lashing it that morning.