Shot for the Day (18 February 2018)

The first decent (weekend) day of weather in London for almost a month and I was out to grab some more shots of London. Above is the Lloyds building with the Leadenhall Building to the right (also affectionately know as the Cheese Grater).  The curved glass facia of the building behind me to my left was throwing a lovely afternoon golden glow on the Lloyd building.

I wondered down to the river over the course of the afternoon and set up on the north shore of the River Thames, overlooking Tower Bridge and the Shard. A gaggle of photographers descended upon my location moments after I set up, which somewhat took away from the moment. However, they were a friendly bunch of mature gentlemen, so were very pleasant company.

Advertisements

Shot for the Day (20 January 2018)


Taken in 2017 in south east Devon, this singular tree stood alone on the common.  Above, storm clouds gathered. Indeed, I just managed to pack away before the rain fell hard. As the scene was devoid of much colour, black and white seemed a better way to convey the sinister, brooding scene best.

Shot for the Day (07 January 2018)


It was a glorious day in London today, so I grabbed the camera and headed to the South Bank. As Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament are currently under wraps, the Millennium Wheel seemed like a good place to grab a few shots.  This photograph was exposed for almost 7 minutes, hence the motion blur and absence of people (best way to remove them from the scene).

Shot for the Day (10 December 2017)


As the rest of the UK received a large dumping of snow, the Isle of Wight instead had high winds and squally rain showers.  This is an image of the Needles on the west cost of the Isle of Wight. Walking up from the car park, the winds were in excess of 60 knots, which translates to mid force 11 winds, a few knots shy of hurricane wind speeds!

Shot for the Day (21 September 2017)


Having had a succession of great weather days, the Scottish summer finally set in on my third day in the Isle of Harris and Lewis. I was up well before 4am and had been walking around the beach looking for a good spot to shoot from, without disturbing the sand. This shot was taken at just after 5am, just as I was about to give in. The rain had been gradually falling since dawn broke and I was sure that there would not be a decent image to capture under such circumstance. I am glad I persevered. The light in this picture is quite eerie but I like it.

Shot for the Day (30 March 2017)

High in the Andes, the deep blue skies can be deceptive. This was mid-morning and the lake in front of me was frozen.  At night, the temperature regularly dropped to -20 Celsius.   It was also breathless here as I was standing at over 4,200m altitude.

If you like desolate, abandoned places, the Atacama Desert is the place for you.

Shot for the Day (12 March 2017)

Believe it or not, this is late spring / early summer in Ushuaia.  You can just make out the city across the Beagle Channel to the right on the coast.  The clouds rolled in from the south (which in this case, the next landmass is Antartica) and it started to snow (this would be like late May in Europe).  We were on a yacht and the boat was at a constant 30 degree angle as we sped across the waves back to town.  It was unbelievably cold and all of the passengers were required to stay on deck.

On the plus side, the wildlife we had travelled over to see did not seem to care about the impending storm.

Shot for the Day (09 March 2017)

Last time I was in Ushuaia, the most southern city in the world, was back in 2010.  I visited Argentina, Bolivia and Chile for a 20 day photography trip.  I started in Tierra del Fuego and worked my way north.

Ushuaia is an industrial town, situated next to the Beagle Channel, nestled amongst the mountains.  Whilst wondering along the waters edge, I cam across this old tug that had run aground.  The scene felt as desolate as the wintry weather that was lashing it that morning.

Shot for the Day (08 February 2017)

shot_of_the_day_08feb17-5

End of day in Iceland in 2011 when I cycled round the island. It was the middle of summer and on the first few days, the temperature was a balmy twenty degrees Celsius.

A few days later, the skies open and for the remainder of the 18 day circumnavigation, the weather was in single digits and rained steadily most days.  However, what stays with me above all else from Iceland was the unrelenting wind. Regardless of one’s orientation, the wind seemed to be permanently against one. If ever I have been close to quitting on a ride, it was several days into that experience.

shot_of_the_day_08feb17-9